Film Transfer Articles & Resources | Current Pixel

Looking to Convert 8mm Film to DVD? Check Out Current Pixel in Atlanta

If you have 8mm film filled with precious memories, meaningful content, or valuable records, you can convert 8mm film to DVD, Blu-ray, or digital files for greater preservation. You may have heard that 8mm film can deteriorate over time, so conversion to DVD, Blu-ray, or digital is the best way to keep your memories viewable for years and years to come. If you’re looking for a professional, experienced, and top-notch company to help you convert 8mm film and keep your content safe for years to come, then look no further than Current Pixel. Why Choose Current Pixel to Convert 8mm Film? At Current Pixel, we take the best possible care of your 8mm film, whether you have Regular 8mm, Standard 8mm, Double 8mm, or Super 8mm film. We can also help you figure out which type you have, in case you’re not sure! We have the ability to convert all these types of 8mm film and will keep you informed throughout the process. As a highly professional company with decades of experience among our staff members, at Current Pixel we use the same frame-by-frame film scanners used by the Academy of Motion Picture Film Archives in Hollywood, which is why we provide our clients with such magnificent results! Though Current Pixel began as a locally focused company based in Atlanta, Georgia and surrounding areas, with over 31 years of experience in the media conversion industry, Current Pixel has helped customers from all over the United States. Even if you are shipping your 8mm film to us, we will never ship your memories to a third party, will update you...

For Professional Film Transfer in Atlanta, Choose Current Pixel

Current Pixel has been preserving memories with professional film transfer since 1985, and members of our team of professionals have decades of experience. We make sure to have the most updated and efficient technology, and all our digital convergence happens on site at our Atlanta location, meaning we never outsource to a third party! The Importance of Digitizing Film with a Professional Working with a professional, experienced expert in converting 8mm, Super 8, and 16mm film allows you to transfer your memories to usable, updated formats without worrying about losing any of the footage or not getting what you want. We utilize advanced technology and an experienced staff to make sure your memories are safe and returned exactly the way you want them. Serving All Kinds of Customer Needs At Current Pixel, we are able to help customers with all different types of film conversion needs. Some individuals and families might have old film with mystery footage on them without the technology to access them. Some might know exactly what they would find on their old film without the ability to watch. Such precious film being stored in homes could be from much older generations and contain priceless memories of parents, grandparents, etc. Some customers might want to convert the home movie film of parents and grandparents to give them as a gift. Other customers might be enthusiasts of old films or even professionals interested in digitizing an archive or collection of film but do not want to invest in expensive conversion equipment. Contact Current Pixel Whatever your situation and whatever film you might have in need of conversion, Current Pixel...

What Type of Home Movie Film Do I Have?

If you have looked at your film stored at home, filled with precious home movie memories, and wondered, “What type of film do I have?”—you are not alone. There are actually three common consumer film formats: 8mm (also known as Regular 8), Super 8, and 16mm. Depending on when your film was created, you might have any of the three. Luckily, we can convert all three formats to digital files, DVD or Blu-ray at Current Pixel, and our team will know which format you have when you bring it in for conversion. Still, here’s some more information about the three types so you can identify which you might have. 8mm (Regular 8) Regular 8 first became popular for consumers to use in the year 1932, when the Eastman Kodak Company released it onto the market. Regular 8 film is made from 16mm stock but was cheaper for consumers to purchase for their home movies than the 16mm format. To create the 8mm film, only half of the 16mm would be exposed during filming and turned around once the end of the film was reached. During processing, the film would be split down the middle, ending up with the two strips of 8mm film rather than 16mm. By splicing the ends of the two 25-foot 8mm strips together, a 50-foot 8mm reel of film was created, which is why your regular 8 film is 50 feet long rather than 25 feet. Super 8 Super 8 first became popular in the mid-1960s. Both Regular 8 and Super 8 are 8mm wide from one edge to the other, but Super 8 film...