Media Conversion Blog | Current Pixel

What Type of Home Movie Film Do I Have?

If you have looked at your film stored at home, filled with precious home movie memories, and wondered, “What type of film do I have?”—you are not alone. There are actually three common consumer film formats: 8mm (also known as Regular 8), Super 8, and 16mm. Depending on when your film was created, you might have any of the three. Luckily, we can convert all three formats to digital files, DVD or Blu-ray at Current Pixel, and our team will know which format you have when you bring it in for conversion. Still, here’s some more information about the three types so you can identify which you might have. 8mm (Regular 8) Regular 8 first became popular for consumers to use in the year 1932, when the Eastman Kodak Company released it onto the market. Regular 8 film is made from 16mm stock but was cheaper for consumers to purchase for their home movies than the 16mm format. To create the 8mm film, only half of the 16mm would be exposed during filming and turned around once the end of the film was reached. During processing, the film would be split down the middle, ending up with the two strips of 8mm film rather than 16mm. By splicing the ends of the two 25-foot 8mm strips together, a 50-foot 8mm reel of film was created, which is why your regular 8 film is 50 feet long rather than 25 feet. Super 8 Super 8 first became popular in the mid-1960s. Both Regular 8 and Super 8 are 8mm wide from one edge to the other, but Super 8 film...